Maximizing Strength Endurance For Superior Performance

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Looking to take your performance to a whole new level? Want to become an unstoppable athlete that no one can go up against? If so, strength endurance is key.

What is strength endurance and why is it so important for you? Let’s take a closer look at what strength endurance is all about and how you can go about optimizing it.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD MY 6 FREE STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING WORKOUTAND NUTRITION PROGRAMS

What Is Strength Endurance

Strength endurance essentially refers to your ability to maintain strength over an extended period of time. Many athletes are very strong. It doesn’t take a lot to become strong – just progressive overload in the gym and time.

But, how many of those athletes can sustain their strength over a lengthy period of time? The answer to that is not many. And this is where you need to put your focus. By developing the ability to not only be strong but to keep that strength up even when you’re working for longer than 10-15 seconds, you’ll become unbeatable.

When fatigue sets in, this is when most athletes and combat athletes go down. Their opponents, if they are not as fatigued, are at a significant advantage and they are now vulnerable to attack.

If you can be the one who isn’t fatigued, it’ll be them who is vulnerable.

Additionally, when you train for strength endurance with all-out short duration intervals, studies suggest that you can train your body how to better utilized muscle glycogen, which can then lead to better performance and endurance levels.

Maximizing Strength Endurance

So how can you go about maximizing your strength endurance? What you’re going to need to do is focus on doing an exercise for longer than the average 6-10 reps you might be doing right now.

Timed sets are where it’s at. This means performing as many reps of a particular exercise as you can before moving on to the next. Structuring your workout in a circuit style fashion will also help to increase your overall level of cardiovascular fitness, which also comes into play when figuring out your ‘fatigue factor’, so to speak. The better cardiovascular condition you are in, the easier it’s going to be to push through those intense moments.

Finally, you’ll also want to focus on using these principles on major compound exercises. It’s these exercises that recruit the most muscle fibers and utilizing the most energy, therefore it’s these movements that are going to be best for helping you optimize your strength endurance.

This is precisely what the following workout is going to do. I’ve put together a strength endurance workout that is fast paced, highly effective, and will have you seeing results in no time.

Strength Endurance Gym Workout

For this workout session, you’ll want to perform each exercise, doing as many reps as you can, for a 45 second period. Once that work interval is up, you’ll then move into a 15 second rest interval, moving quickly to the next exercise in line.

Once the entire circuit is completed, you’ll then rest for two minutes before repeating a second and third time through. Remember that form is key! At no point during this workout should you let good form slip. If you feel your form going, lighten the weight (if using a load) or take a brief rest and start up as soon as you can once again. Nothing is worth using poor form.

If you do, you’ll risk injury and won’t be hitting the muscles properly in the first place.

Here is a workout to help you with your strength endurance…

Metabolic Strength and Muscle Endurance Workout

Perform each exercise for 45 seconds of work followed by 15 seconds of rest
Rest for 2 minutes and repeat for 3 rounds.

Exercise List

1. Barbell Deadlifts
2. DB Front Squats
3. Alternating Single DB Press
4. Hanging Knee Raises
5. Heavy KB Swings
6. DB Hammer Curls
7. Dips
8. Side Lateral To Front Raises
9. Mountain Climbers
10. DB Bench Step Ups

Reference:
Burgomaster, Kirsten A., et al. “Similar metabolic adaptations during exercise after low volume sprint interval and traditional endurance training in humans.” The Journal of physiology 586.1 (2008): 151-160.

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